I Laugh At Your Rejection

A few months ago, I sent my last query letter to an agent. I knew I wanted to get my work out there, but it was clear as day it wouldn’t be through the traditional way, so I focused on indie publishing.

As time passed, I got more and more excited about publishing my work on my own terms. I’m prepping myself for releasing my books sometime around September/November, and it’s been an amazing experience (working with editors, doing marketing courses, engaging with readers, growing a platform, I’m loving it.)

Today, though, I received one last rejection letter (remember my last query? Yup!)

It was a really nice form rejection, mind you, but still a rejection. And I couldn’t be happier.

See, today is also the day I beat my mailing list’s subscriber record.

Ever since I started giving out free stories for e-mail subscribers, I’ve been receiving encouraging e-mails from people who loved what I wrote. People who found me on the web, didn’t owe me a thing, and just had to tell me how much they appreciated my work. (You’re all AWESOME, by the way.)

How amazing is that?

No one can tell you, “You’ll never make it.”

No.One.

Just because an agent has rejected you, it doesn’t mean people will hate your work, or that your book sucks, or that you’re a bad writer. It’s a highly subjective business, and there’s no right way to publish anymore.

A rejection is an e-mail saying someone thinks your work isn’t good enough. And you know what? There are people out there who won’t like your work, just as there are people who will love your work. And that’s fine.

Just remember: an agent’s opinion is not the only opinion that matters anymore.

C.S. Wilde writes about fantastical worlds, love stories larger than life and epic battles. She also, quite obviously, sucks at writing an author bio. She finds it awkward that she must write this in the third person, and hopes you won’t notice.

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Posted in Editing, Lifestyle, Marketing, Publishing, Revising, Things I saw on the Internet, Writing, Writing craft
35 comments on “I Laugh At Your Rejection
  1. Tony Burgess says:

    If you ever saw the movie Julie and Julia you saw the frustration the Julia Child had in getting a book published. These days self publishing is a real alternative because of the technology available.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. angietrafford says:

    I have never got round to writing a query letter… Mainly because I have not finished my first draft yet! Anyway, the strangest rejection that I have ever received came from a large company that when my work on a writing site. They told me that they really liked a certain story of mine, and to send them a copy in word. So I did. Then they rejected it, which I just found hilarious because they were the people that asked. I never wanted to get that particular story published! However, it just goes to show that somewhere someone likes my writing!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Allison W says:

    I have several queries out to agents currently, so I’ve still got my fingers crossed for the traditional route right now.

    I wish you the best of luck with self-publishing! I look forward to seeing your book released!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ana says:

    Right on, girl! You keep going and never give up!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. When I was in school I loved studying Detroit. Sounds weird, but there was a class. What I learned is that a number of black people in the city couldn’t get published because, well, race stuff, so one man created Broadside Press. It was basically a story or a poem on a piece of thick paper that he would sell on the corner. We’re not talking fame and riches, but if the goal is to share your stories, this story is amazing. His name is Dudley Randall. “Publishing” is anything you want it to be. If you don’t believe me, just remember that Marcel Duchamp said a urinal turned on its side is art, and everyone agreed.

    Like

    • C.S. Wilde says:

      I will agree there is a lot of bad work out there, but there are also pretty great authors (Andy Weir and Hugh Howey for one) who were constantly turned down by trad pub and ended up selling millions of copies by their own. ; )

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Very true. That’s why I’m leaning heavily towards indie publishing. I like the idea of controlling my finished product. Maybe my second WIP I’ll try the traditional route.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Girl, you nailed it! Good for you.
    Hey, Booktrope Publishing is accepting submissions (I signed with them in March when they accepted my indie-published novella.) They are a hybrid publisher (not to be confused with vanity publishing. Booktrope provides authors with creative teams and the sales profits pay everyone, so the author does not pay for them to publish thier books.) Many of advantages of trad pub, but no agent needed. They have a real supportive community. Check them out.
    http://www.booktrope.com

    Like

    • C.S. Wilde says:

      Cool, thanks for sharing!

      Like

    • C.S. Wilde says:

      So I basically get edits and covers for free and we share the royalties? So no initial capital needed? This is how trad pub should work, gosh darn it! I can’t submit “A Courtroom”, because I already had it proofread and the cover is getting ready, but I’m definitely using this for “Tales” ^_^

      Like

      • Booktrope is one of a kind. They use team publishing. I have a team (we are all equals and we each have our expertise to complete the book project.) The team has an editor, proofer, book manager, cover artist, and me, the author. We are ALL paid from a 70% pool after the book makes its sales. BT gets 30%. There is *no* upfront costs or flat fees for anyone’s services. However, authors are expected to market their work continuously (which is wise and expected in trad publishing too, anyway.) The website is very informative. It’s a lot of work, but I’ve been very happy with Booktrope and their team publishing community.

        Liked by 2 people

      • C.S. Wilde says:

        Oh, I’m definitely signing up.

        Liked by 2 people

  8. Cristina Van Estes says:

    I’m so excited for you. I think there’s a lot of positives in going indie. I imagine sending out query letters is scary business, but it looks like you’ve survived with good spirits!

    Liked by 2 people

    • C.S. Wilde says:

      Oh, definitely. It is tough, but it’s all part of finding what’s best for you. After I started researching more about Indie, I realized I reeeeally liked the aspect of owning your business. It’s all about finding what’s best for you. Many people think trad pub is the one and only end line, but it’s far from it.

      Like

  9. Bunk Strutts says:

    You might want to talk to Bob Kroese for tips. He’s a good guy, began with a humor blog consortium years ago, has a few books out. If he can get published, anyone can, and you can tell him I said so.
    https://www.facebook.com/robertkroeseauthor

    Like

  10. Anna says:

    You’re right. And agents aren’t the one who buy your future books, so your readers opinion is probably worth more than the agents opionions in the long run 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  11. […] Nice post by CSWilde. I Laugh At Your Rejection. […]

    Liked by 1 person

  12. sarahh0x says:

    Love this post, you know what they say – everything happens for a reason! x

    Liked by 1 person

  13. A.B Mood says:

    Your work will be out by Sep/Nov?? That’s amazing newsss! Just keep going strong. Those stupid agents have no idea what they’ve given up on. When you make it big you can give em your evil laugh ^_^

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Reblogged this on Dan Alatorre – AUTHOR and commented:
    This is smart as hell. Watch for me to do it soon.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. I love the positivity of your post. I’ve been considering looking for an agent in the last few weeks, even bookmarked some that I shortlisted, but then I did nothing because I realised that I had got it wrong. It doesn’t matter what I think of them because it’s their call, they have to like me, and judgement is a scary thing. My motivation is high, why should I let them knock me down with a rejection?

    Liked by 1 person

  16. I hope you don’t mind a late reply. I just found this post today through a reblog.
    My story is basically identical to yours. I queried for about eight months before I decided no agent would find my book marketable. So I released it myself last February. I was still getting agent rejections months after release, as my book landed on a couple of Amazon best seller lists (where it’s been climbing since early April). THAT will make you laugh. 🙂
    Wishing you the best in your new adventure!

    Liked by 1 person

  17. What a great and encouraging article, along with all the awesome replies 🙂 Wishing you every success!

    Liked by 1 person

  18. I enjoy rereading this post. I love the message.

    Liked by 1 person

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